There’s still time to order Christmas cards!

Looking for an AWESOME Christmas card and waiting until the last minute? You still have time to order one of our independent artist created greeting cards and have it delivered before Christmas! Just order by Sunday, December 19.

Want to hand deliver the card with that special present? No problem… just select “send to myself” when you’re personalizing your card and we’ll deliver it to you with an extra envelope. Or you can have us deliver the card directly to your loved one… and as always, shipping is free!

View all of our Christmas cards at http://www.cardgnome.com/holidays/christmas

And don’t forget to Like us on Facebook!

There’s still time to order Christmas cards!

I’m an Entrepreneur (just don’t call me a startup)

This is a guest post by Patrick Stinus, a co-founder of Seventh Element , a management consulting firm that provides “Fortune 100 tools to small businesses” to help them grow and increase profitability.

I was recently on the phone catching up with Joel and it dawned on me that while we’re both entrepreneurs, we operate in completely different worlds. If you were to ask, 99.9% of people they would see very little differences in our stories. We both worked in the GE “fast track” program which promised us lives of success and the “the American Dream”. We both left it behind to start our own businesses, take a shot at changing the world and do work that makes us truly happy. The difference is that I’m not trying to launch a startup, I’m starting an agency.

Start”ups”, especially ones that focus on technology, are what most people envision when they think about when you quit your job to “follow your dreams.” They’re typified by years of living on Ramen noodles, working 70 hour weeks, bootstrapping and sometimes pimping yourself to private money. They are designed to cheaply and quickly create a completely new (or incredibly better) product or service. It takes time without revenue to develop new products.

Agencies are businesses whose core value proposition is the skill set of its employees. I co-founded Seventh Element to bring the business management tools we perfected at GE to small businesses. We skipped the long, costly, and iterative product development phase and went straight to clocking billable hours to our clients. We can leverage our corporate pedigree to potential clients and make money within the first month of existence.

If you graph the profits of successful startups, they follow an exponential curve, where they bumble along for a long time making very little money and then get traction and “pop.” Since these businesses have such high-profit margins, which aren’t tied to hours available to bill, they have the potential to create hugely scaleable businesses which can be sold for hundreds of millions of dollars. The agency model theoretically starts with respectable profits on day one and grows in a modest, linear, path as it bill more hours and hires more talent that can be billed. An agency is far less risky, but is much less scaleable.

I am not trying to oversimplify the challenges our agency has faced, or imply that leaving a steady job for an agency is more (or less) respectable than a startup. The fact is that agencies have a good chance of making reasonable money, and startups have a low chance of making stupid money. If you do the rough math, the upside is similar. Owning a business is a personal decision, and the money is just one piece of the puzzle. Their isn’t a right or wrong way to do things, but keep this comparison in mind if you are deciding on starting your own business.

I’m an Entrepreneur (just don’t call me a startup)

5 lessons before launching your startup

“Nine to five is how to survive – I ain’t trying to survive… I’m trying to live it to the limit and love it a lot”

-Jay-Z

Last week I had a discussion with someone considering leaving their job to launch a startup.  They wanted some honest feedback on their business model. It occurred to me that objectively evaluating a startup idea is a skill that can only be learned through experience and that I finally felt marginally comfortable giving advice on the topic. After 8 months of making mistakes, listening to great mentors and thinking through many ideas it felt great to give back. For those of you I haven’t spoken with, I wanted to jot down some of the key lessons I’ve picked up along the way.

1 – Understand your goals – You need to be honest with yourself about whether you want a massive business or a lifestyle supporting income source.  All your thoughts about the startup must flow through the answer to this question.

2 – Passion – If you are creating the next big thing, realize you’ll need to have the passion to devote 70+ hours a week for 3-5 years to make it a success. Is this an industry and product you will stay excited about? Note that I’m not saying the product has to be sexy, plenty of people make huge profits on products others didn’t even consider working on.

3 – Test instead of talk – Try to test your idea without spending money and time on development. If your core-product is a consumer website, there are ways to test your prototype extremely cheaply. Once its built, give it to customers and ask them if they are willing to pay for it. Try to avoid the echo chamber of your friends and family. Their support will carry you through the tough times, but they are terrible judges of what constitutes a great business idea.

4 – Financial resources – You need to eat, you need a roof and you need to provide for your family. If you can’t do this while devoting the time and effort for a startup, then its not for you. Getting funding is a long and arduous process and will likely require that you’ve already gotten traction with your product.

5 –  Product-Resource Fit (Viability) – What resources do you need to make your company successful? Do you have, or can you acquire, the skills, money and other resources needed to implement your idea? Be optimistic but honest. In order to make your dream a reality you will need to fully believe you can do it.

A lot of you are founders of companies, use that comment box to talk about your own lessons or expand on mine.

5 lessons before launching your startup